North America

RokGallery module North America (id=331) does not have a gallery selected

Central & South America

RokGallery module Central & South America (id=332) does not have a gallery selected

Southeast United States

RokGallery module Southeast United States (id=320) does not have a gallery selected

The Carolinas

RokGallery module The Carolinas (id=321) does not have a gallery selected

Robert Mills Maps

RokGallery module Robert Mills Maps (id=308) does not have a gallery selected

Northeast United States

RokGallery module Northeast United States (id=322) does not have a gallery selected

Midatlantic United States

RokGallery module Midatlantic United States (id=323) does not have a gallery selected

West United States

RokGallery module West United States (id=324) does not have a gallery selected

Midwest United States

RokGallery module Midwest United States (id=325) does not have a gallery selected

Southwest United States

RokGallery module Southwest United States (id=326) does not have a gallery selected

City Plans

RokGallery module City Plans (id=327) does not have a gallery selected

Charts

RokGallery module Charts (id=311) does not have a gallery selected

Europe

RokGallery module Europe (id=328) does not have a gallery selected

Africa

RokGallery module Africa (id=329) does not have a gallery selected

World Maps

RokGallery module World Maps (id=310) does not have a gallery selected

Robert Mills Maps from "The Atlas of the State of South Carolina"

A protégé of Thomas Jefferson, Robert Mills is known to have helped define and shape the architectural symbolism of the early republic. Robert Mills trained under Jefferson becoming the first native-born American architect. He is most well known for the Washington Monument and the Smithsonian Institute, yet he was responsible for many other government buildings in Washington, D.C. In the South, his beautifully designed buildings are scattered throughout the state of South Carolina.

The Atlas of the State of South Carolina was presented to the South Carolina State Senate in 1826. It was the first systematic atlas of any state in the union, and it was touted as being significantly better than comparable European publications. Mills devoted nearly 4 years of his life to this project. As an architect, surveyor and cartographer, he contributed to this vast project in a variety of ways. Responsible for producing the first atlas of an American state, he later noted that South Carolina was now acknowledged to be in advance of her sister states. The legend of each map bears the surveyor's name and notes that the map was improved for Mills' Atlas, 1825. Mills himself reprinted the Atlas in a rare edition in 1838. The second edition can be distinguished easily from the first because the year 1825 was erased from the printing plates before they were reused. Frequently the district maps of the first edition are not colored, but the ones of the second edition all seem to have boundaries of magenta watercolor.